Breathe new life into your home with four eye-pleasing 2022 interior design trends

Colourful Living room
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A renovation journey.

Join us for a continuing series as we bring a relatively untouched, tired-looking 1960’s builder’s-box bungalow into the 21st century.

. . . . .

By Masha Koyen

If you’ve fallen out of love with your home, the best way to reignite that fizzling flame is to bring it up to date with some new interior design details. It just takes a little inspiration to fall back in love with your home.

Here are the four latest 2022 design trends to help bring your home up to date.

The “grandmillennial” look

We’ve all been raised to believe less is more in the world of interior design. Well hold onto your hats kids, because this is the complete opposite approach for the popular “grandmillennial” look. This design trend is all about over the top, borderline kitschy decor that screams look at me! This is probably the reason it is also affectionately known as “granny chic.”

Get the Look

We’re talking all out patterns on walls, drapes and soft furnishings, detail overdoses from fringe to contrasting piping, and grandmother-worthy furniture that is ornate and frilly. This is a great opportunity to save money and shop the consignment boutiques for great estate finds ideal for repurposing. Mix the old in with some modern pieces and the new dolled up look will make you smile every time you enter the room.

Reclaimed wood

Reclaimed and repurposed are the new buzzwords of interior design. Adding focal points in your home with salvaged wood creates an authentic look to your space.

Get the Look

Floors, wall treatments, shelves, mantles and more can all be updated with reclaimed and repurposed wood. If you can’t afford the real thing, there are tons of faux options available at your local home improvement store.

Segmented open-concept spaces

This might sound like the complete opposite of what you should do, but bear with us. This is not to say you should start building walls, but instead, look for ways to create more separate intimate spaces in open-space floorplans. Part of the challenge of living in open spaces is that even one messy spot, like unwashed dishes in the kitchen, creates a mess for the entire main floor. This is very disenchanting, making coming home stressful. As well, with more people working from home, the open concept limits private spaces.

Get the Look

There are many ways you can create segments such as creative partition walls, hanging trendy beaded walls, or even using art in creative ways. If you’re using the granny chic look, patterned drapes are très mid-century modern, allowing you to pull the drapes across when you need privacy or want to hide a mess.

Add curves

Sensual curves in home furnishings soften the edges and create a feeling of movement. They also modernize a room as an emerging interior design theme.

Get the Look

Introduce soft curved shapes in furnishings, art, and architectural details. You can even consider a customized arched or circular window at the top of the stairs, the peak of your attic, or in your bathroom.

These ideas can be applied to suit any budget, while fanning the flames of your dying relationship with your in-need-of-an-update, passé home décor.

. . . . .

Watch for the project website and YouTube channel coming soon! ready-set-reno.ca

In today’s pandemic-era environment, world-wide supply chain issues and construction delays are a reality, so plan your renovation well and be prepared. As things get underway, we’ll be sharing exciting before, during and after content including a video series featuring top experts and you’ll be able to virtually tour the project at various stages of completion.

Masha Koyen is the founder of Content Vertical, copywriting and content strategy for the design-build industry.

photo credit: design by Annie Schlechter as shown in Better Homes & Gardens

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A Renovation Journey. Join us for a continuing series as we bring a relatively untouched, tired-looking 1960's builder's-box bungalow into the 21st century.
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